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7:00

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07:45
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08:45
Workshop
Onion Space
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Countless studies have been proving how mindfulness meditation can help you effectively manage stress and time, sleep better at night, and have a higher quality of living and relationships. A regular meditation practice shifts the structure and function of your brain towards the direction of greater emotional intelligence via neuroplasticity, and integrating mindfulness into your everyday life may be easier than you think. Along with a guided meditation, learn the basics of mindfulness meditation, how it works and helpful tips. 

Yoga inspires positive thinking & body strength. The second half of the session provides you with small steps to integrate mindful movement into your daily life, focused on breathing and pausing to focus on your center. 

All levels welcome!

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9:00

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09:00
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09:10
Talk
Glaskiste
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Opening remarks and introductions with FOSS Backstage co-founders Isabel Drost-Fromm and Stefan Rudnitzki

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09:10
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09:50
English Talk Beginner
Glaskiste
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If you are a Free Software (Open Source Software) developer, do you have to follow an open development model or a certain business model? Do you have to believe in or be a supporter of socialism, capitalism, or liberalism? Do we, when we work for software freedom, have to agree on certain positions on privacy, intelligence services, the military, the climate catastrophe, nuclear power, vaccinations, or animal rights? Or should we accept to have different views or even allow each other not to discuss certain views, because what brings us together are other values?

I will argue that the core values of our movement are that everybody, no matter what background, can use the software for every purpose without discrimination. That everybody is allowed to study how software works. That you are always allowed to share your software with others, either to help other human beings or to make money. And that no individual, organisation or government should be forced to change their behaviour because of the software, but according to our principles, adapt and thereby improve the software for themselves and others.

Furthermore, the talk understands itself as a plea for more respect and diversity in Free Software communities. It will be argued that while sticking to those values we should treat others decently who might have other believes, or another or no opinions at all about a topic we ourselves care about. That we should not try to put an emphasis on our other believes while working together on Free Software/Open Source Software, but instead work together with other groups or movements to bring our other topics forward.

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09:50
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10:30
Talk Beginner
Glaskiste
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The community is the heart of every open-source project. Without a proper functioning community, the project is bound to have a heart attack, which could be the end: Think of unsatisfied users, project forks, maintainer burnouts, or very annoying arguments.

Building a community can be a daunting task but it doesn't have to be. All it takes is a critical mass of people who have a long-term interest in growing the community. Be it companies or individuals.

As it turns out, this group can systematically foster the community by building a framework for community interaction: writing down guidelines, helping users, onboarding new contributors, etc. The next step is to break out of the daily business through organizing conferences, meetups, or regular face-to-face meetings. Ultimately, the community is held together by relationships which are best strengthened via face time.

In the past years, I've seen two different communities grow: Apache Flink and Apache Beam. Both have found a way to grow their community. I'd like to present and analyze the paths they chose to build the strong communities they have today.

 

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10:00

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10:30
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10:50
Discussion
Glaskiste
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Coffee Break

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10:50
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11:30
Asynchronous Collaboration

Be The Leader You Need

Megan Byrd-Sanicki
Talk Intermediate
Glaskiste
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Open source crossed the chasm into mainstream with users in all industries. Maintaining the users’ trust and sustaining innovation is key to open source’s success. 

However, in a world where communities are passionate, multicultural, and primarily use online communication, it is challenging to move communities towards a shared vision in a frictionless, sustainable way. Community challenges can impact innovation, putting user adoption at risk and even more importantly, hurting community members.

Stronger open source leadership can address these challenges and there is a call for more leaders in every project. Good news! Every contributor is a leader either through self leadership, leading others, or leading the community, yet most people have never been trained on how to lead.

This talk provides the leadership the training you need and covers:

- Why strengthen community leadership

- Key leadership and emotional intelligence principles

- Practical ways to lead as a contributor

 

 

 

 

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11:00

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11:30
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12:10
Talk Beginner
Glaskiste
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Many activities these days, be it sports, social work, arts or free and open source software, are organized in some sort of community. If backed by a respective organization, this not only helps with setting up a structure, but also puts statutes and rules in place that set forth the values and ideals all contributors should share. Inside these communities, there can be various roles. Some of them are formalized, like the board of directors or the supervisory board, others are within dynamically grown groups that can change frequently. Either of those are ideally composed of experienced and enthusiastic community members who take leadership and responsibility.

Based on my experience from the last 16 years, I'd like to point out common problems when working in an international free and open source community, share mistakes I've made and tell how you can hopefully avoid them.

 

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12:00

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People are often motivated to contribute to Open Source projects by their "right brain" creative and “artistic” side, more than on a financial rewards or career ambition basis.

However, the “left brain” financial and career rewards of being involved in Open Source are tangible in many cases, benefitting both employer and employee, especially when taking a mid-term or long-term view.

Programmers become better by learning new tools, techniques and programming style from brilliant community members. Communication and organizational skills are also greatly improved by being involved in multi-cultural remote communities, where decisions are made asynchronously and most often in writing. Being exposed to quality software all the time, which is common in projects that build the foundation of the Web, also helps us raise the bar on what we consider good software.

All this translates to greater efficiency on the job, greater software quality as well as improved soft skills and team efficiency.

The benefits of contributing to Open Source are demonstrated in many startups and companies, for both employee and employer. If your boss is not convinced of that yet, this talk will help change that!

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12:50
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14:00
Discussion
Glaskiste
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Lunch Break

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14:00

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14:00
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14:40
English Talk Beginner
Glaskiste
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The advancement of web technologies has created an opportunity for developing tools for real-time collaborations, text-mining, interactive data visualisations, sharing reproducible compute environments, etc. These tools can change the ways researchers share, discover, consume and evaluate research and help promote open science and encourage responsible research behaviours. Through its Innovation Initiative, eLife invests heavily in software development, new product design, collaboration and outreach so that the potential for improvements in the digital communication of new research can start to be realised. In particular, we support exclusively the development of open-source tools, with extensible capabilities, that can be used, adopted and modified by any interested party and actively engage the community of open innovators. In this talk, we will introduce the following projects: * Fostering collaboration and innovation through hacking: eLife Innovation Sprint (https://elifesci.org/Sprint) * Mentoring and empowering a generation of open innovators: eLife Innovation Leaders (https://elifesci.org/InnovationLeaders) We believe that openness is crucial to the future of research, and by supporting the community and promoting open-source research software, we can help build a culture towards integral, collaborative, open and reusable research. We hope to share some of our visions and learnings, and invite feedback and contributions from the wider open-source community on the next steps forward.

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14:40
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15:20
Talk Beginner
Glaskiste
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"Open Source takes Product Management to a whole new level -- I had no idea!" said one workshop participant in Poland this Summer. "How on earth do you keep all those stakeholders happy?". He was Senior Product Manager at an $8bn software company.

Uniting design, engineering, and business to produce viable products that customers love is the famously difficult job of Product Managers. Managers of Open Source products however serve not only demanding customers of commercial services, but also a wide range of contributors, packagers, committees, and partners. Our decisions must be fair, transparent, and still ultimately drive revenue. Our Open Source apps are creatively used in scenarios we cannot dream of, yet making usable interfaces requires restricting ourselves to a narrow set of user-stories and personas.

How can Open Source PMs harness wildly diverse userbases, putting their feedback to work improving our software, without diluting product vision and strategy, or losing focus on the bottom line? In this presentation we will explore the unique challenges and opportunities of Open Source Product Management, drawing from the experiences of an Open Source project with 20 years of history.

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15:00

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15:20
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15:40
Discussion
Glaskiste
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Coffee Break

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16:00

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16:20
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17:00
Talk Beginner
Glaskiste
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Inner Source is applying Open Source values and principles within the boundaries of a corporation. But what actually are these values and principles? And what happens if they meet corporate values and principles?

In this presentation we will go on a tour through open source values and reflect on how they match or mismatch corporate values. We will see what practices fit in an Inner Source scenario and what tactics can be applied to use open source values as leverage to improve processes, collaboration, and openness within a corporation.

Where do values such as transparency, collaboration, commitment, or predictability belong? How can an Inner Source program make use of them, combine them, and contribute to the success of a company? The audience will hear about our experience, get inspiration for their own work, and food for thought for further discussions around the topic.

 

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